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Foundation and brief history of the Botanic Garden Teplice

Teplice’s Botanic Garden is the only one in the region of Ústí nad Labem. It was inaugurated on 1st January 2002 by order of the town council in an area that had been used for horticultural purposes for about one hundred years. Not much is known about the exact use of the garden in the 19th century but it is rumoured that the Count of Clary-Aldringen played an important part in its early establishment. We do know that the building plans from 1904 show various houses designated as Stadtgärtnerei indicating that they were to be used for city horticulture. The original glasshouses provided both fresh flowers and the over-wintering of palm trees and various other hot house pot plants for the spas of the town. Thanks to Mrs Marie Sternthalová these glasshouses were reconstructed at the beginning of the 1970s and opened to the public in March 1975. At that time, as part of the Municipal services, it was this institution’s job to provide plants for the town’s various municipal parks.

At its official inauguration, the Garden ‘inherited’ about 2000 species. In about one hectare less than a half were planted out in the open air, by far the larger part of the inherited plants were the tropical and sub-tropical species exhibited in the glasshouses. By our standard today these exhibitions were quite modest but even then due to our various activities and the work of our dedicated staff the Botanic Garden was well worth a visit. The unique and very old plants which can still be found amongst our collection are: the African conifer Afrocarpus (Podocarpus) gracilior (Fern Pine) or a cycad coming from the same area Encephalartos villosus(Poor Man´s Cycad),, a beautiful Mexican Sandpaper SotolDasylirion serratifolium or fifty-year-old cacti and other succulents from the collections of Prof. F. Eck and especially Teplice’s cacti planter V. Pulec. We must also mention two seventy-year-old and richly yielding examples of Kentucky Koffeetree Gymnocladus canadensis.

 

Text taken from the official site Botanical Gardens